curriculums

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REGGIO EMILIA

Reggio Emilia values “the potential of all children to think, learn, and construct knowledge.” Like Montessori Reggio Emilia is a progressive, child-centered approach to education. The idea is that the child must be free to discover and to learn for himself. Reggio Emilia does not go any further than the early childhood years. It focuses on toddlers and preschool children.

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MONTESSORI SCHOOL ADAPTATION

“The Montessori school environment is arranged according to subject area — cooking, cleaning, gardening, art, caring for animals, library corner, etc. — children always free to move around the room instead of staying at desks. There is no limit to how long a child can work on something she has chosen.” – The International Montessori Index

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CREATIVE CURRICULUM FOR INFANTS & TODDLERS

The framework that guides The Creative Curriculum® for Infants, Toddlers & Twos has routines and experiences at its center. That’s because the routines and experiences that structure each day, and the responsive care and teaching provided during these times, are what enable children to develop a secure attachment with the important people in their lives and gain confidence in themselves as learners.

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CREATIVE CURRICULUM FOR PRESCHOOL

The Creative Curriculum® for Preschool is a comprehensive, research-based curriculum that features exploration and discovery as a way of learning, enabling children to develop con dence, creativity, and lifelong critical thinking skills. It is designed to help educators at all levels of experience plan and implement a developmentally appropriate, content-rich program for children with diverse backgrounds and skill levels.

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3-4 YEAR OLDS READ TO LEARN

Reading at grade level by the third grade is a leading indicator of school success and high school graduation, but despite steady gains in grade-level reading in Miami-Dade County, too many children fail to achieve this critical benchmark. This pivotal year in a child’s life is when they must make the shift from learning to read to reading to learn. If they don’t, the consequences are dire. Eighty-eight percent of children who never graduate from high school were poorly performing third-grade readers, and high school dropouts earn less than half of college graduates.